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Posts tagged infographics


Photo

Nov 3, 2013
@ 11:30 am
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xkcd
Tall Infographics

xkcd

Tall Infographics


Photo

Oct 16, 2013
@ 10:40 am
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175,985 notes

best visual explanation.
lezgirlsrock:

What an excellent, succinct representation of that.

best visual explanation.

lezgirlsrock:

What an excellent, succinct representation of that.

(Source: cjguest, via departmentsaur)



Photo

Aug 25, 2011
@ 9:40 am
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1,419 notes

truth. so much truth.
thecaronival:

you forgot cardigans.

truth. so much truth.

thecaronival:

you forgot cardigans.

(via girlsgotafacelikemurder)


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Aug 24, 2011
@ 9:40 am
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sitting is killing us.

sitting is killing us.



Photo

Jul 28, 2011
@ 12:30 pm
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3 notes

Mapnificent: How Far Can You Travel via Public Transport in a Given Time?

Mapnificent [mapnificent.net] by Stefan Wehrmeyer reveals the specific geographical area one is able to reach by using public transport from any point in a city, and within a given time. The service is currently available for most major cities in the U.S., and for quite a few other cities worldwide. One simply chooses a specific location, or places a draggable pin on the online map, selects a specific time span, and the reachable zone is highlighted on the map.
Interestingly, these time- and location-based queries can also be combined with a ‘traditional’ search for local services, like ‘coffee places’ or ‘musea’. Accordingly, one can figure out a good restaurant that is located within 15 minutes travel time of a public transport bus, for instance.
For those interested, the service is conceptually closely similar to Mapumental.

via infosthetics.com

Mapnificent: How Far Can You Travel via Public Transport in a Given Time?

Mapnificent [mapnificent.net] by Stefan Wehrmeyer reveals the specific geographical area one is able to reach by using public transport from any point in a city, and within a given time. The service is currently available for most major cities in the U.S., and for quite a few other cities worldwide. One simply chooses a specific location, or places a draggable pin on the online map, selects a specific time span, and the reachable zone is highlighted on the map.

Interestingly, these time- and location-based queries can also be combined with a ‘traditional’ search for local services, like ‘coffee places’ or ‘musea’. Accordingly, one can figure out a good restaurant that is located within 15 minutes travel time of a public transport bus, for instance.

For those interested, the service is conceptually closely similar to Mapumental.

via infosthetics.com


Photo

Jul 9, 2011
@ 12:30 pm
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1,172 notes

i love that nyc is broken out as its own country, as big as the rest of the states.
laughingsquid:

The World Map of Useless Stereotypes

i love that nyc is broken out as its own country, as big as the rest of the states.

laughingsquid:

The World Map of Useless Stereotypes




Quote

Apr 20, 2011
@ 9:12 am
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What we should do is learn why people actually prefer the less ‘effective’ infographic, and apply this knowledge to further the field (e.g. people prefer circular graphs). What we should not do is critiquing a talented designer because a panel seemingly frames his work incorrectly as having complex analytical value.

@infosthetics comment regarding Stephen Few’s Teradata, David McCandless, and yet another detour for analytics


Photo

Mar 15, 2011
@ 1:30 pm
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1 note

The History and Origins of Science Fiction: an Infographic

Artist Ward Shelley maps the history of science fiction in painstaking detail. See the way big version here. Accurate?

via flowingdata

The History and Origins of Science Fiction: an Infographic

Artist Ward Shelley maps the history of science fiction in painstaking detail. See the way big version here. Accurate?

via flowingdata


Photo

Mar 6, 2011
@ 1:30 pm
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23,740 notes


Infographic of the Day: TIL the plastic tags attached to loaves of store-bought bread aren’t just for show, but are actually part of a color-coded system indicating the day the bread was baked.
The more you know.
[consumerist.]

via thedailywhat


Infographic of the Day:
TIL the plastic tags attached to loaves of store-bought bread aren’t just for show, but are actually part of a color-coded system indicating the day the bread was baked.

The more you know.

[consumerist.]

via thedailywhat


Photo

Mar 2, 2011
@ 1:02 pm
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3 notes

Rick Slusher’s stunning and elegant winning entry for Co.Design’s Inception Infographic Contest.
via the original post, here’s Rick explaining his process:

I started brainstorming my entry in the airport, appropriately enough. The only tools I had available were the proverbial napkin and a pen, and I started sketching while waiting for my flight.
My infographic is fundamentally a timeline of Inception’s dream architecture, with each character’s trajectory represented. Characters are shown dropping in and out of one another’s consciousness as they progress through the dream layers. I wanted to emphasize the movie’s timeframe premise — that the perception of the passage of time increases with each deeper dream layer. My initial thought was that concentric circles would be a good diagrammatic approach, as the nested circumferences would be able to expand and converge as necessary to reflect the scaling timeframes.
There are also a couple of subliminal aspects to the design, as a nod to some of the popular alternative plot theories about Inception. Limbo is represented as the black void of the background, and the characters enter and exit the diagram from that same black void, suggesting that “reality” itself may only exist within a dream after all. And the shape of the diagram resembles a kicking foot, alluding to the idea that the movie’s events may actually be Mal’s efforts to “kick” her sleeping husband back to reality.

Rick Slusher’s stunning and elegant winning entry for Co.Design’s Inception Infographic Contest.

via the original post, here’s Rick explaining his process:

I started brainstorming my entry in the airport, appropriately enough. The only tools I had available were the proverbial napkin and a pen, and I started sketching while waiting for my flight.

My infographic is fundamentally a timeline of Inception’s dream architecture, with each character’s trajectory represented. Characters are shown dropping in and out of one another’s consciousness as they progress through the dream layers. I wanted to emphasize the movie’s timeframe premise — that the perception of the passage of time increases with each deeper dream layer. My initial thought was that concentric circles would be a good diagrammatic approach, as the nested circumferences would be able to expand and converge as necessary to reflect the scaling timeframes.

There are also a couple of subliminal aspects to the design, as a nod to some of the popular alternative plot theories about Inception. Limbo is represented as the black void of the background, and the characters enter and exit the diagram from that same black void, suggesting that “reality” itself may only exist within a dream after all. And the shape of the diagram resembles a kicking foot, alluding to the idea that the movie’s events may actually be Mal’s efforts to “kick” her sleeping husband back to reality.


Photo

Feb 11, 2011
@ 3:20 pm
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