VERBA VOLANT, SCRIPTA MANENT

"if i'm not sharing it, i'm not enjoying it."


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Jan 19, 2014
@ 12:32 am
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Jan 18, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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86 notes


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Jan 17, 2014
@ 5:34 pm
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this movie gave me all the feels.


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Jan 17, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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ozmat:

www.ozmat.org


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Jan 16, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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14,008 notes

kilabytes:

Assassin’s Cat 3 & More

by Gan Zu

A selection of work’s from a series by artist Gan Zu, inspired by some of the most iconic art and imagery from the biggest video game titles, where cat’s replace role of the protagonist.

Also find the artist on - 

weebly

(via technohell)


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Jan 15, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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3 notes

who would win?

who would win?


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Jan 14, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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moms-oldfashioned-cervix-sauce:

I don’t mean to brag but I’m spending my Saturday night sending suggestive cat snapchats.


Text

Jan 13, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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88,844 notes

quietonset-rollin:

flash-thunder:

Women make up 45% of the gaming community and 0% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest games of the year.

"Yes, but that’s still a minority! If more women played video games, there would be more reason to have female protagonists!"

Men make up 35% of the cinema audience and 84% of the protagonists of the 25 biggest movies of the year.

2014 is the year to start making changes, Ladies.


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Jan 12, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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xkcd

xkcd


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Jan 11, 2014
@ 8:57 pm
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1 note


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Jan 11, 2014
@ 2:34 pm
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John de Lancie is just Evil Tom Hanks. Discuss.


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Jan 11, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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17,359 notes

(Source: thesparkler, via nuclearsad)


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Jan 10, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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162 notes

putthison:

While people generally adhere to group norms for fear of disapproval or reprimand, anecdotal evidence and the occasional study suggest that high-status folk feel free to break rules—by eating with their mouths open, violating traffic laws, and expressing unpopular opinions. But how is nonconformity interpreted by others? Do we see it as a sign of status? New research, to be published next near in The Journal of Consumer Research, suggests that we do. The authors call the phenomenon the “red sneakers effect,” after one of them taught a class at Harvard Business School in her red Converse.
The New Yorker: Why Mark Zuckerburg Gets Away With Hoodies

putthison:

While people generally adhere to group norms for fear of disapproval or reprimand, anecdotal evidence and the occasional study suggest that high-status folk feel free to break rules—by eating with their mouths open, violating traffic laws, and expressing unpopular opinions. But how is nonconformity interpreted by others? Do we see it as a sign of status? New research, to be published next near in The Journal of Consumer Research, suggests that we do. The authors call the phenomenon the “red sneakers effect,” after one of them taught a class at Harvard Business School in her red Converse.

The New Yorker: Why Mark Zuckerburg Gets Away With Hoodies


Photoset

Jan 9, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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293,540 notes

this is from a Pantene advert, but it’s so damn true. reblog forever.

(Source: yearofyixing, via drpepper10)


Video

Jan 8, 2014
@ 2:09 pm
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